Graduate Course Offerings

BLAW 5175. Business, Law, and Ethics in Modern Society

H1S1 (Requirement).

In order to survive, business must meet the legal and ethical standards imposed by a changing society. Business enterprise is not an island and business decision making must be undertaken in light of current legal and ethical demands. Such demands may take the form of globalization of the business enterprise, reactions to hostile takeovers, concerns with market concentration and efficiency, changes in legal philosophy and corporate ethics, and developments in international law and administrative regulation. By examining the philosophical, legal, social, historical, and political/economic regulatory environments, this course places business decision making in the legal and ethical perspective so critical in today’s markets.

 

BLAW 5181 – Government and the Legal Environment of Business

Open to MBA students, others with permission. Not open to students who have passed or are currently enrolled in BLAW 5182. (RG2090). 1.5 Credits.

This course covers the legal and ethical environment of business, including an introduction to legal institutions and legal process, intentional torts and negligence, product liability, corporate governance, securities regulations, employment law, intellectual property and related topics. This course delivers the essentials of “legal astuteness,” enabling students to ensure regulatory compliance, manage legal counsel, minimize liability and reach value-added business decisions in an increasingly complex regulatory environment.

 

BLAW 5182 – Business Responsibility, Accountability, and Ethics

Prerequisite: BLAW 5181. (RG 5605). 1.5 Credits.

This course focuses on the four pillars of responsible business conduct — business ethics, corporate social responsibility, sustainability, and business and human rights — and is designed to facilitate values-driven decision-making in the social and ethical environment of business. Topics also include fairness in the workplace, shareholder resolutions, bribery and corruption, health and environmental stewardship, and firm-regulator relations.

 

BLAW 5220 – Employment Law

Examines federal and state laws regulating the employer-employee relationship and the dynamics of the contemporary workplace, as well as different legal forums and regulatory mechanisms impacting U.S. employment law. Introduces students to a wide range of problems involving hiring, firing, discrimination, harassment, and accommodation, emphasizes the importance of managing employer-­employee relationships to resolve disputes and grow productivity, and addresses the prevention of claims and mitigation of legal risk in the context of business drivers, operational strategy, and the economic realities of today’s workplace.

 

BLAW 5660. International Business Law

Prerequisite: BLAW 5175. Open to MBA students, others with permission (RG2998).

This course examines major issues in international law by focusing primarily on the extensive legal and ethical environment of the modern international marketplace. Key topics to be explored include international intellectual property, employment, and environmental issues. The course will also help students understand key institutions in the international legal system and learn about current legal topics related to international trade and foreign investment.

 

BLAW 5680. Securities Law

Open to MBA students, others with permission (RG2998).

This course examines U.S. federal securities law, the Securities and Exchange Commission and other regulatory bodies to provide knowledge of the rules and institutions of securities regulation as well as  related policy issues and strategic considerations by market participants. Emphasis is placed on the legal and ethical responsibilities of corporate managers and executives, accountants, underwriters, and broker-dealers, and on the global and transnational aspects of securities transactions. The Securities Act of 1933, the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and reforms implemented by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act are covered.

 

BLAW 5894

Special Seminars. This course number designates investigation and discussion of special topics. Seminars with a change in content may be repeated for credit. Listed below are examples of Business Law seminars that have been offered recently in Storrs, Hartford and/or Stamford.

 

BLAW 5894. Foreign Investment Laws and Regulations

H3 (Special Seminar. International Elective. Prerequisite: BLAW 5175).

This seminar will examine international business law from the viewpoint of host countries. The basic objective of the course is to raise questions, not answer them. A willingness to read, explore, think and discuss is essential to the success of the course and, consequently, to the success of the student. The course is not designed to lay out rules or regulations governing foreign investment; simple answers are avoided, such is the nature of the beast. This course is designed to stimulate discussion and thought by raising diverse regulatory issues of different countries, while always focusing on the essential question posed by the course: It examines the policy of the host government regarding foreign investors and how such policy encourages or discourages, assists or impedes operation of multinational enterprises.

 

BLAW 5894. Trade Regulation

H3S3 (Special Seminar. Elective. Prerequisite: BLAW 5175).

This seminar intensively analyzes federal and state regulation of business. Special emphasis is placed on the Sherman & Clayton Antitrust Acts, the Robinson-Patman Price Discrimination Act, the Federal Trade Commission Act and the “Little” Sherman & FTC Acts, as well as state “unfair competition” laws. Laws relating to franchising, credit, consumer protection, copyrights, patents and trademarks will be examined. In addition, the relationship of trade regulation to international business transactions will be addressed.

 

BLAW 5894. The Law of Consumer Protection, Advertising and Marketing

H3 (Special Seminar. Elective. Prerequisite: BLAW 5175).

The law of state and federal consumer protection is examined. Special emphasis is placed upon the Federal Trade Commission Act and its state analogues and the law of unfair competition. Intellectual property law, including patent, copyright and trademark protection will also be studied. The legal responsibilities of advertisers, marketers and their agents, as well as the rights of both consumers and competitors will be covered in detail. Another focus is on trends in consumer protection, with special emphasis on contemporary standards for deceptive advertising, including the constitutional implications of such regulation.

 

BLAW 5895. Independent Study in Business Law

H1S1 (Elective. Prerequisite: BLAW 5175). 

MBA students can take up to six credits of Independent Study. Independent Studies can be pursued in any area of interest to the student. A proposal for Independent Study must be submitted for approval by a faculty advisor, the department head and the MBA Program Director.